Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Bubble Room Red Velvet Cake

 
 
3 3/4 c. self-rising flour
2 1/4 c. sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
3 eggs
1 1/2 tsp cocoa
1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
1 1/2 tsp vinegar
2 1/4 c.  vegetable oil
1 1/2 c.  buttermilk
1/3 c. red food coloring (this is NOT a typo)
16 oz. cream cheese
1 1/2 c.  butter
2 lb powdered sugar
1 c.  chopped pecans
  1. Preheat oven to 350°
  2. Sift together dry ingredients in a bowl.
  3. Add eggs, vinegar, oil, buttermilk, vanilla, and food coloring and mix well.
  4. Spoon into three greased and floured 9" cake pans.
  5. Bake 45-60 minutes or until layers pull away from the sides of the pans. (Check after 45 minutes, they will probably be done then).
  6. After cooling 10 minutes (no more, I don't know why), remove the cakes to wire racks to cool completely.
  7. Meanwhile, beat cream cheese and butter in mixer until fluffy.
  8. Slowly add in powdered sugar and mix until fully incorporate and smooth. (Personally, I'd increase the pecans by a cup, and add them into the frosting here, but Bubble Room doesn't do that)
  9. Layer the frosting between each layer of cake, and liberally over the top and sides. Top with chopped pecans.
*Recipe courtesy of the Fort Myers Junior League
 
 
If you found the cake unappetizing or heavy, you may have under-beaten the eggs. When I make red velvet cake, I cream together the sugar and oil first (I use canola instead of vegetable oil for a lighter flavor) and then add each egg, beating well after each addition. I literally beat the crap out of the mixture after adding each egg. By the end of your egg additions, your mixture should be almost twice as big as it was before you started--it should start taking on an almost "fluffy" appearance. You need to beat a whole lot of air into the eggs to keep a cake with this much oil from seeming heavy and greasy. After you've beaten in the eggs, add your dry ingredients alternately with the buttermilk. Add the vanilla, food coloring, and vinegar last and mix. After you've added the dry ingredients (flour, etc.), don't mix too much or your cake will form a lot of gluten and will take on a bread-y flavor.
 

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